A word of caution for sales trainers

I have referred to this point in some of my recent blogs but I really do want to stress how important I believe the issue to be – I keep coming across the problem time and time again, both with SMEs and larger companies. The big assumption many sales trainers make is – “The business model, propositions, products and services offered by those being trained do actually capture the voice of the customer and align to needs”.  This can be a dangerous assumption to make.

This very point came to light only this week when one individual I was talking to after an event said – “I just do not believe in the product and what it delivers” – a training course will not improve performance if this is the case. In my experience is that many large corporates fail to see this and when under performance kicks in managers go straight to HR to request a relevant sales course. How much money has been wasted on such occasions?

The very fact that someone does not believe in a product could be two-fold, firstly the because market does not want it, this results in constant customer knock backs or secondly the individual has a personal hang up with what is being sold. If it’s the former – a rethink of strategy, innovation is necessary so speak to the customers. If the latter then that could be one of many reasons ranging from lack of product knowledge through to personal motivation. Coaching from a respected colleague or manager can be a highly effective way of getting to the heart of the matter.

Advertisements

One Response to A word of caution for sales trainers

  1. Hi John, you make a vital point! It’s a classic example of how knowledge can be badly managed in any organisation. There might be a lot of sales data being generated and analysed – but in addition to that there’s always unwritten knowledge as well. People who are selling products and talking to customers pick up on all kinds of signals from customers about their needs, reactions and buying preferences, and most organisations are not good at capturing this knowledge. Or when it is presented to them, it’s ignored or misinterpreted (as a training need). Organisations need to listen more to their frontline staff – they’ll learn a lot.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: