The power of your personal brand

27/08/2015

It is not uncommon for people to choose or buy their favourite branded goods and items. This is because we have an affinity with them both emotionally and functionally. This is a concept you must apply to yourself – personal brand. An ability to strike a good relationship is dependant upon the personal chemistry we develop with others. Successful people have a powerful ability to connect with others through their personality and personal power.

Start to cultivate your personal brand as the success of future relationships. Partnerships and connections will largely hinge on how others view and perceive you. You can think of your personal brand on three levels:

Functional mastery – the expertise you bring and what you are good at. This element of your personal brand should articulate that you are accomplished at your vocation, trade or profession. Others will trust your judgement when you know what you are talking about.

Social Mastery – this is the ability to communicate effectively with others and develop meaningful dialogue. The social dimension also extends to our personal networks with which we associate. Credible, honourable and professional people tend to maintain ethical and similarly professional company – all too often we can be judge by the alliances we have – so be careful.

Spiritual Mastery – this relates to the how you conduct yourself, personal beliefs and values we maintain. Strong personal brands deliver on their promises, they are extremely ethical and transparent in how they conduct themselves and their life.

Think about your own personal brand and how you are perceived. Do the best job you can, develop an ability to engage with your community effectively and be a great communicator. Also be clear on what you stand for and don’t deviate from a strong ethical position. By doing this, you will build a strong personal brand – one that others will want to associate with.

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Do you have a competitive edge?

17/06/2014

The school of thought that assumes all high growth businesses are technology based is wrong. Fast-moving companies display an edge that connects with their customer’s world, one filled with imagination, inspiration and fresh thinking. Their founders and teams have an inherent ability to spot a niche, an unfulfilled need or problem demanding a solution.

Gazelle performance can be achieved by repackaging a traditional idea. The fusion of a diverse range of business models to produce a whole new experience is a skill high growth entrepreneurs have perfected.

Focusing on activities that don’t necessarily bring in revenue can also attain the edge. However, they do position the organisation head and shoulders above the rest. In other words they produce a wow factor. Leading experts in creativity would claim that 95% of a company’s point of difference is achieved by as little as 5% of what it does.

High growth businesses excite their customers by displaying their edge with passion and clarity. Companies must avoid falling into becoming a “me too” market player – this drives down margins, the cheapest wins, a sort of spiral descent very difficult to recover from.

So how do you find the edge? It starts with the mindset of the leader – old world tells us to think outside the box. My recommendation is to get rid of the box because it does not exist – eliminate limiting beliefs, self-imposed boundaries and negative influences that restrict your ability to think. Find a coach or a mentor who will help you fill the pipeline with new possibilities. Find your 5%!


What’s your position? A lesson for gazelles

01/04/2012

I read a great article this week, passed on to me by my mate Julian Grice (he’s a top lad when it comes to branding and marketing, probably the best I have come across) – it was all about positioning and game changing strategies for high growth companies. There were four fantastic examples of companies that repositioned their brands with dramatic effect:

1. Apple….from geeky nerds to a cool brand probably the biggest on the planet

2. Domino’s…..moved from selling pizzas to focusing on service and delivery excellence

3. Red Bull….repositioned the drink from one for exhausted lorry drivers to life style marketing for “go getters” 

4. Netjets….from selling private jets to adopting the time share model (the results speak for themselves)

This is a lesson for all gazelle businesses…..a tweak in what you do, for a new segment can have a massive impact. Here’s to the start of a high growth week!


Where is the next Tony Wilson?

15/06/2011

Regional economies are built on big personalities and individuals with the passion and determination to succeed. Tony Wilson in my book was a hero. He made a significant contribution to Manchester and the North, his enthusiasm for music, culture, regeneration and business in general was amazing. His personal brand became synonymous with promoting the Regions business interests. He did things for the right reason, the greater good of the people who made this place their home.  He made a massive difference in many ways leaving a legacy that many of us can only dream of.

He put Manchester on the world stage and contributed to its brand and profile. Others have tried to follow but without the same impact – probably because they have their own interests at heart, namely celebrity status and not making it a better place for the next generation of stars.

The challenging economic environment I hope will see the emergence of a new generation of individuals with the same passion and determination of Tony Wilson.

 

 

 

 


The Power of the Brand

05/05/2011

I was sat in Costa Coffee on Oxford Road in Manchester this morning and it created an extremely thought-provoking experience. Having been in a meeting nearby, myself and colleague Heather, decided to go and have a brew to catch up on a few things that needed to be sorted for next week……..

Within the space of 5 minutes a queue of 30 people deep developed, an orderly line leading out on the street. With only two people serving – who I must admit were doing a fantastic job – an amazing buzz was maintained in the cafe, no one moaning or grumbling.  Many of these customers had been waiting for over 15 minutes for a take away coffee without complaint. Under normal circumstances most people would have walked out but they just waited with amazing patience.

Popular brands can withstand challenges because they act as a magnet to others and create a customer experience that breeds loyal followers. There was a spirit about the place that combined – great location, sound employees, quality product and a physical environment that pulled people through the door. At the end of the day those waiting could have gone 100 yards up the road and purchased their breakfast without the painful wait – but the power of the brand and the experience acted as a form of gravitational pull to Costa fans. I got the feeling that there was no other place to go when the reality was other options did exist.

A great customer experience is enhanced by a fantastic brand, a lesson for all growth wish entrepreneurs who want themselves and their business to stand out from the ground.