Academic achievement must go hand in hand with an entrepreneurial mindset

30/04/2015

The next three months will see universities churning out thousands of very proud new graduates – BA Hons, BSc’s the lot. A great education with brains packed full of new learning, knowledge and facts. But why do so many fail to find a job? How many of these bright new graduates have had their prospects limited by the conditioning of the external environment? These young adults have been supported in life skills and getting their head in shape for the next stage of their life. How many walk away with a personal growth plan that defines very clearly how to move their life on and make the best of their three years spent at university? How many have thought creatively about next steps… charity work, setting up their own business, free lancing using specialist skills they have acquired?

My view, is that we have some of the best academic institutions in the world and we create some of the finest talent, but so many never realise their potential and end up in jobs that fall way below their true capability – futures that lack direction, bouncing around from one job to another. It’s no use having a long list of qualifications if you don’t put them to best use. More effort and energy should be put into developing the creative and entrepreneurial mindsets that drive ambition and ultimately greater achievement. If you cant find a job why not create your own and set up in business? We need to see more graduate entrepreneurship.

I speak from experience, I left university in 1986 with a degree in Chemistry – great technical skills, but struggled having conversations, making presentations and generally selling myself to potential employers – no skills for life. I am not sure much has changed to be honest – I had to work it out for myself. We need to equip this next generation with a more rounded experience thereby allowing them to combine great academic qualifications with a mindset conducive to achievement and releasing personal potential. We must remember that we get what we think about. The universities are a rich seam of next generation entrepreneurs, work is needed to getting them started.

Are the cap and gown, the photograph that hangs on mum and dads wall and the handshake from the university chancellor the best send off we can give them? As well as the well-earned degree certificate, they should all leave with a “plan for life” or maybe a plan for their own business.

Advertisements

Entrepreneurial mindset in changing environments

19/02/2015

The journey to reaching your vision will involve a number of stages or interim goals – the key milestones that will be your targets along the way, providing a route to your dream. Each stage will represent a progression either personally or professionally – or both, depending on your vision. As your goals move on, so will the circumstances you find yourself in and the challenges you’ll face. It’s likely that decisions you have to make will become more demanding and the risks more acute. To handle this changing environment, you’ll need to progress personally, shifting your mindset to a new level at each stage.

The critical steps in growing a business or embarking on a challenging new project will place pressure on the way you think – it will push you into new areas and possibly further than you have gone before. It’s likely to stretch your abilities to the limit. So it’s important to adapt your way of thinking to be able to cope with the new risks and challenges each new situation brings. Otherwise you will find yourself frozen like a rabbit in the headlights, unable to make the necessary decisions to take you forward.

Successful entrepreneurs, for example, will tell you that growing their companies tested their capabilities to the breaking point. How comfortable will you feel if you need to give a personal guarantee to secure bank funding, or learn new skills to support the growth of your business or personal project?

To prepare yourself for the climb ahead, it pays to work out the different challenges you’ll face as you move from achieving one goal to embarking onto the next, so that you can be mentally ready to deal with them. Viewing each goal as a step towards your vision will help you to define the mindset that you need to develop to negotiate each stage successfully, allowing you to move forward with focus and clarity of thought.


Scale up companies – The cost of growth

03/12/2014

The scaling of companies is a topic I have been interested in for some years. More specifically why don’t more entrepreneurs go for more ambitious growth? A scale up company is defined as one that grows its employee or turnover at a rate of 20 per cent per annum over a three-year period. Taking entrepreneurs to Silicon Valley the home of scale ups, motivating founders to raise the bar through coaching and creating communities of like-minded business people have all featured in my quest to create more of them. My experience tells me that those who decide to have a go recognise there are two principle costs to growth. These costs are presented in two forms. Firstly, the emotional cost to the individuals involved, this usually manifests in self imposed pressure and the uncertainty that demands resilience and mental toughness to keep going when the inevitable road blocks are presented.

Growth Staircase

The second cost is money hemorrhaging from the till – this is the investment. Pivotal to building infrastructure and embedding the platforms companies of scale require. Within a scale up business costs can rack up very quickly – recruiting new talent, cost of raising finance, professional fees, new premises, IT infrastructure and administrative costs can shoot through the roof. Costs must be controlled and the execution of a growth plan needs to be effectively choreographed – clear roles need to be defined, people need to be accountable for delivering on their tasks. Very rarely can growth be achieved without impacting on profitability, sounds like a statement of the obvious, however as Sherlock Holmes said – There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.’

Coming to terms with the two principle costs of growth is the very reason why the majority of the 500,000 of last year’s new start up’s will never go on to employ one person never mind 10. It’s also why over 99% of UK firms employ less than 50 people. Busting through the natural ceilings of growth requires entrepreneurs to pass the alignment test – once head, heart and wallet are in sync then growth can at least have the chance to happen. Without it, business as usual prevails. So often it’s the financial cost of growth that holds individuals back – once you can get over it in your mind and accept the facts, only then can you move on. This is a hiatus that many entrepreneurs reach – very few get through it.

The UK needs more companies of scale; it’s these businesses that bring about the added value to the economy – innovation, graduate jobs, links to HE and hopefully international trade. Lets give ambitious individuals the trusted advice they deserve. It’s only with a good team around you that you can move forward in an aligned fashion.