Accessing Your Creative Mindset

25/11/2015

Connecting more regularly and effectively with your Creative Mindset will increase your chances of driving innovation into your organisation. By accessing this zone, you solve problems more effectively, difficult situations in business are approached objectively and options on how to progress a new project become considered and well thought through. Admission to this heightened state of awareness is only possible when we do away with pride, black and white thinking, and dominant beliefs that distort a forward thinking mindset. Such interference results from deep-rooted prejudices, however, when we quieten the mind we tune into our inner voice, this produces clarity of thinking that delivers inspired focus and guidance. We enter the Creative Mindset through absolute silence and stillness – creating a successful business means working ‘on it’ and not ‘in it’, this means time is needed to escape the noise that comes with the day-to-day grind.

Successful business people in my experience allocate a significant proportion of their time to uninterrupted thought. Whilst hustle and bustle is familiar territory for ambitious people, so is solitude. It helps to work out solutions to the challenges and opportunities growth presents. By making time for silent reflection we hear much louder our inner voice. You will be surprised how effective it is in navigating your actions in the right direction.

The flashes of inspiration and fantastic ideas that we enjoy from time to time come from a completely relaxed state of mind, they don’t present themselves when we are anxious or stressed. Often the harder we try the further what we want to achieve moves away. This noise resulting from unhealthy states of mind totally dampen the voice of reason that lies deep within us.

Don’t use the excuse that you don’t have time for silent contemplation, let go of being too busy and allow your Creative Mindset to speak. Here are some simple steps:

  • Write down the challenge, opportunity or issue you need to resolve – be precise and specific
  • Repeat three times what you need answers to
  • Find your place of sanctuary – no telephone, radio or noise of any kind
  • Use the slow breathing to meditate on the challenge
  • Do this for 15 minutes and at the end of the session – write down any ideas

The answer will come to you at the right moment. Practice is vital, you must be consistent and you must commit to this activity. No one is too busy to find 10-15 minutes a day. It is these moments of planning that will deliver a lifetime of freedom.

 

For more advice around success mindset for business growth, visit Winning Pitch, Business Challenges page

 

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Academic achievement must go hand in hand with an entrepreneurial mindset

30/04/2015

The next three months will see universities churning out thousands of very proud new graduates – BA Hons, BSc’s the lot. A great education with brains packed full of new learning, knowledge and facts. But why do so many fail to find a job? How many of these bright new graduates have had their prospects limited by the conditioning of the external environment? These young adults have been supported in life skills and getting their head in shape for the next stage of their life. How many walk away with a personal growth plan that defines very clearly how to move their life on and make the best of their three years spent at university? How many have thought creatively about next steps… charity work, setting up their own business, free lancing using specialist skills they have acquired?

My view, is that we have some of the best academic institutions in the world and we create some of the finest talent, but so many never realise their potential and end up in jobs that fall way below their true capability – futures that lack direction, bouncing around from one job to another. It’s no use having a long list of qualifications if you don’t put them to best use. More effort and energy should be put into developing the creative and entrepreneurial mindsets that drive ambition and ultimately greater achievement. If you cant find a job why not create your own and set up in business? We need to see more graduate entrepreneurship.

I speak from experience, I left university in 1986 with a degree in Chemistry – great technical skills, but struggled having conversations, making presentations and generally selling myself to potential employers – no skills for life. I am not sure much has changed to be honest – I had to work it out for myself. We need to equip this next generation with a more rounded experience thereby allowing them to combine great academic qualifications with a mindset conducive to achievement and releasing personal potential. We must remember that we get what we think about. The universities are a rich seam of next generation entrepreneurs, work is needed to getting them started.

Are the cap and gown, the photograph that hangs on mum and dads wall and the handshake from the university chancellor the best send off we can give them? As well as the well-earned degree certificate, they should all leave with a “plan for life” or maybe a plan for their own business.


Entrepreneurial mindset in changing environments

19/02/2015

The journey to reaching your vision will involve a number of stages or interim goals – the key milestones that will be your targets along the way, providing a route to your dream. Each stage will represent a progression either personally or professionally – or both, depending on your vision. As your goals move on, so will the circumstances you find yourself in and the challenges you’ll face. It’s likely that decisions you have to make will become more demanding and the risks more acute. To handle this changing environment, you’ll need to progress personally, shifting your mindset to a new level at each stage.

The critical steps in growing a business or embarking on a challenging new project will place pressure on the way you think – it will push you into new areas and possibly further than you have gone before. It’s likely to stretch your abilities to the limit. So it’s important to adapt your way of thinking to be able to cope with the new risks and challenges each new situation brings. Otherwise you will find yourself frozen like a rabbit in the headlights, unable to make the necessary decisions to take you forward.

Successful entrepreneurs, for example, will tell you that growing their companies tested their capabilities to the breaking point. How comfortable will you feel if you need to give a personal guarantee to secure bank funding, or learn new skills to support the growth of your business or personal project?

To prepare yourself for the climb ahead, it pays to work out the different challenges you’ll face as you move from achieving one goal to embarking onto the next, so that you can be mentally ready to deal with them. Viewing each goal as a step towards your vision will help you to define the mindset that you need to develop to negotiate each stage successfully, allowing you to move forward with focus and clarity of thought.


7 thoughts on dealing with the pressure and loneliness of running a business

30/09/2014

One of the LinkedIn groups I am a member of, asked if anyone had any tips on how to attain a good work/life balance and deal with the pressure and loneliness (at times) of being a company leader. As I got a few likes on my response, I thought I would share it on my blog.

I have always had a keen interest in the entrepreneurial mindset, in fact I have written a book on it as well. Having observed lots of successful business people over the years, it would appear that those who win, have good housekeeping embedded in their company, strong customer focus and one that often gets overlooked – mental toughness and resilience.

Growing a business is a roller coaster and you should expect the unexpected, period. The loneliness of running a business is a reoccurring comment made by individuals I meet – here are some thoughts:

  1. Many of the things we worry about are of are own making – be careful of the conversations you have with yourself, they can be extremely destructive
  2. Create space to think – success is 20% thinking and 80% doing. So many business people forget the importance of ‘time to think’ (I walk my dog for 2 hours a day over the Lancashire Moors).
  3. Have 2-3 people whose views you respect and trust – give them a call.
  4. Get involved with entrepreneurial networks – we are all worrying about the same things. Be open and share.
  5. Aim to build a great team who can share the burden.
  6. Life is short – remind yourself that a late payment is not the end of the world. Far worse things could happen.
  7. Maintain good health – without it… Say no more.