High Growth, Charles Darwin and Silicon Valley

08/03/2012

Entrepreneurial high growth leaders can extract an enormous amount of insight from the great man himself, Charles Darwin. The ability to embrace change is such a vital ingredient to the recipe for accelerated performance.  Growing a company can sometimes feel like a fight for survival and there is so much evidence to suggest that those who adapt and change come out the other end fitter, stronger and more competitive.

This week I having been ranting on about the importance of nurturing better leadership skills. Companies will grow and create more jobs only when their founders fine tune their ability to build a strong team based ethos. Growing a business requires the essentials of both personal and business change, the former being the precursor to developing a thriving and winning environment. The requirement of the individual to embrace with confidence new situations and challenges is key.

On the theme of developing more ambitious leaders, this week marks a very important landmark for the High Growth Foundation. We are taking 18 entrepreneurs to Silicon Valley to see how businesses such as LinkedIn and Google grew to the size they are – global superstars whose leaders truly embraced the the power of change. My mate and highly distinguished journalist Michael Taylor will be out there with the group – reporting on what he’s observing the best do. Hopefully these insights will help not only the delegates but also other members of the Foundation and our broader community to nudge their bar of ambition to a higher level.

 

 

 

 

 

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High Growth Foundation Wow Event – Insights from Google

02/12/2011

What an absolutely fantastic High Growth Foundation event the other night at the Imperial War Museum. Led by Michael Taylor with his usual charm, wit and insight, we had a great line up of speakers who had fantastic and inspirational stories to tell. Steve Oliver and his Music Magpie venture is a real one to watch in the Region, and success could not be more deserved, a really nice bloke. Steve speaks from the heart and his views on creating a loyal workforce with a culture of graft were well received. Deepak Jayaraman from Goldman Sachs articulated the benefits of mentoring and how the 10,000 small business programme can help in this regard.

Alexis Giles delivered a fantastic key-note and shared with over 200 delegates Google’s rules for building an innovative culture and gosh were they powerful, here they are:

  1. Ideas come from everywhere – everyone has a place at the table
  2. Share everything you can – create a culture of sharing new thoughts, no idea is a bad idea
  3. Hire smart people – they create a challenging culture
  4. Chase your dreams – create 20% thinking time
  5. Innovation is not instant perfection – have a go and refine
  6. Data is apolitical – provide the fact to evidence potential
  7. Creativity loves constraint – draws out new ideas quick
  8. Users not money – money follows the eyes
  9. Don’t kill projects, morph them – iterate till you get it right

Alexis was a real star performer and delivered some real value to businesses with a passion to grow. One of the nuggets I took away was the importance of embedding processes and systems as a company grows. Google are a shining example of how an innovative culture fused with discipline delivers excellence. The lack of processes and systems is what so often stunts growth, innovation on its own is not enough.

Alexis and the Google story was an inspiration for ambitious people – so chuffed she will be hosting our  study tour at Google’s Mountain View complex in March 2012 – what an experience that will be. Its not all doom and gloom.


Global Brands – Did they take part in recession?

30/11/2011

The Autumn statement provided depressing news for many households and entrepreneurs trying to build a future. Running a business is hard enough without listening to Euro crisis problems, poor growth forecasts and a recovery in the dim and distant future. The resultant effect of the Chancellors statement for many will be – baton down the hatches and reduce investment in people development and new ideas. This becomes a self fulling prophecy and usually you get what you think about.

There are always different ways to view the world, we can be a builder or destroyer of our own future. Well my advice is life is too short for two years of life to evaporate, i.e sitting there and waiting for economic recovery to happen, we should embrace a mindset of not taking part in the recession. Scarcity is the mother of innovation and history tells us that some of the most successful brands on the planet started or thrived during recessionary times here are just a few examples:

General Electric – Not only did Thomas Edison set this Company up in the middle of a recession it thrived when the US economy faced collapse.

IBM – Set up in the middle of a US economy slump

General Motors – set up during the US financial crash of 1908 and went on a buying spree when the Federal Reserve was approaching melt down

Disney – really started to take off smack bang in the middle of the Great Depression

Burger King – started just after the Korean war, its founders philosophy being people still need to eat

Microsoft – Started by Bill Gates and Paul Allen in 1975 when the United States was mired in stagflation -the combination of rising unemployment and inflation combined with stagnant GDP

CNN – Started when the Federal Reserve made the decision to aggressively raise interest rates to curb inflation, it caused a “double dip” recession

Apple– Apple got its start in 1975, during another downturn and thrived just after the dot-com bubble burst!

So the message is…Its not all bad news, it’s about having a vision and mindset to create something special and different. Whilst we must avoid putting our head in the sand and thinking all is OK, we must find a balance – place one foot firmly on the accelerator and have the other hovering over the brake!


Google comes to the High Growth Foundation

29/11/2011

Creating innovative high performance cultures is what Alexis Giles from Google’s Mountain View HQ (San Francisco) will talk about tomorrow evening. Alexis will share her insights and provide over 250 delegates with a preview of what made Google the global phenomenon it is today. We are also delighted to have Steve Oliver CEO from Music Magpie, one of the North’s potential global stars. Deepak Jayaraman, from Goldman Sachs will provide his highly valued opinion on what his organisation is doing to create more high growth businesses – the importance of leadership, differentiated value propositions, mindset and attitude.

Hopefully this event will stimulate big thinking in the Region and get entrepreneurs to remember “we have one life, give it a go, aim for the big time and avoid any regrets in years to come”. How many times have I heard people say “I wish I would have……….”

Implementing big thinking often means risk, however, if growth decisions are made within a framework of insight and peer-to-peer networks then it creates some degree of comfort to those who have a burning desire to make a difference.

Most successful entrepreneurs I have met have been inspired by someone, something or an event in their life – one that drives change and a new path. I certainly hope this showcase and the study tour we are taking to the West Coast of the States (Silicon Valley) in early 2012, will stimulate individuals to embrace a truly limitless view on where they can take their business. High growth takes courage, determination and balls – this event is for doers not dreamers……