Pitching yourself through life

13/03/2014

Success involves people and organisations having to sell what they have to offer – this could be our skill, a product or service. This term frightens the life out of many as it conjures images of unethical smooth talking individuals manipulating others so as to get their own way. This is not the case, a great pitch is grounded in ethical behaviour fused to a mindset of offering real value through a passionate belief in what you have to offer. Personal and professional progression means that you will frequently be in a situation where you have to pitch for what you want. Applying for a career promotion, a place on the school board or attracting new customers fundamentally means we are in competition and there is a need to sell.

If you don’t adopt this mindset then you will struggle to get what you want out of life. When you find yourself in a situation where selling is vital, start by asking:

  • Do I understand their world?
  • What problem am I going to solve for the person I am pitching to?
  • What do I know about my audience?
  • What value do I bring?
  • What examples can I use to evidence credibility?
  • How can I bring to life the impact I make?
  • What is special about what I have to offer?

Personal progression means you must embrace the philosophy of life is a pitch. In doing this you condition yourself to delivering an effective and engaging performance to those that matter. Convincing others of the benefit of your talent, idea, product or service is an integral component to achieving your goals. Other people have an influence on whether we succeed or not. Your pitching mindset should help you to position your key messages in the following way:

  • Real and tangible
  • Deliver it with passion and meaning
  • Ruthlessly simplistic message
  • Clearly shows the difference you will make
  • Win – win outcome

Practicing your pitching skills to enhance your chances of success. It will put you in a stronger position to beat off competition.


The Silver Bullets – Rules for Gazelles

22/04/2012

Here they are, and they work!

  1. Create and craft differentiated propositions that stand out from the crowd – don’t compete on price, compete on difference
  2. Develop an effective vision, strategy and execute of a practical game plan – communicate this to the rest of your team – success is 20% thinking and 80% doing
  3. Drive innovation into the processes and functions of your company and always look at doing things differently
  4. Embrace change and see it as an opportunity to develop and introduce new propositions
  5. Build a great team – thinkers, sellers, doers and controllers – create a culture where values and behaviours are aligned to delivering great service both internally and externally
  6. Condition your mindset – coping with the challenges that come with growth means a Believe You Can (BYC) state of mind is vital
  7. Live in the “Customer’s World” and deliver services and products that capture their need and voice. Build long-term relationship and keep coming up with new ideas to address their challenges.
  8. Disciplined systems and processes need to be put in place – KPIs that provide a real time state of business health are vital. Key your eye on cash and how you finance your company. Get expert help.
  9. Become great at selling and put the sales engine in place – sales are the lifeblood of any organisations, sell what you believe in as well as the products and services you offer.
  10. Find connectors that can provide answers to the challenges you face – getting experienced mentors, coaches and non executive directors working to raise the bar of performance are an essential ingredient of success

Personal development is the ultimate source of competitive advantage – be aware of what you are good and bad at. Review how you are performing in relation to the Ten Silver Bullets !

 


High Growth, Charles Darwin and Silicon Valley

08/03/2012

Entrepreneurial high growth leaders can extract an enormous amount of insight from the great man himself, Charles Darwin. The ability to embrace change is such a vital ingredient to the recipe for accelerated performance.  Growing a company can sometimes feel like a fight for survival and there is so much evidence to suggest that those who adapt and change come out the other end fitter, stronger and more competitive.

This week I having been ranting on about the importance of nurturing better leadership skills. Companies will grow and create more jobs only when their founders fine tune their ability to build a strong team based ethos. Growing a business requires the essentials of both personal and business change, the former being the precursor to developing a thriving and winning environment. The requirement of the individual to embrace with confidence new situations and challenges is key.

On the theme of developing more ambitious leaders, this week marks a very important landmark for the High Growth Foundation. We are taking 18 entrepreneurs to Silicon Valley to see how businesses such as LinkedIn and Google grew to the size they are – global superstars whose leaders truly embraced the the power of change. My mate and highly distinguished journalist Michael Taylor will be out there with the group – reporting on what he’s observing the best do. Hopefully these insights will help not only the delegates but also other members of the Foundation and our broader community to nudge their bar of ambition to a higher level.

 

 

 

 

 


What do I think about the LEAD programme?

10/10/2011

I was asked today what I thought about the LEAD programme. The truth is it should still be running. For me LEAD was a fantastic stimulus for both personal and organisational change. It helped leaders to personally and professionally grow.

Anyone running a business knows that if you don’t adapt and constantly move with the needs of customers you will quickly get left behind. Living in the “Customers World” by spending at least 3 days a week with them is a habit successful entrepreneurs exhibit. By doing this you get close to their problems and issues, ultimately locking in by becoming a trusted adviser

Any leader should be promoting the fundamental importance of sales. Great selling is about adding value, leaving positive mental imprints of yourself and your business. Integrity, trust and a strong reputation are key foundations of happy customers. Remember – the desk is a very dangerous place to view the market and your customers needs, get out there and practice the philosophy of success is 20% thinking and 80% doing!

LEAD helped to embed these very important principles for growth – bring it back !


Smart Operator – High Growth Individuals

19/07/2011

Recent economic challenges have placed serious pressure on people to think very differently. Business as usual is not an option, its time for something completely different. Cuts in public and private sector budgets have taken their toll – redundancies, lost revenue, projects going on hold…the story goes on. So what’s the answer? Manage decline and depression or look for the opportunities. As one delegate at an event I spoke at the other week put it….”recession, I have decided not to participate”. A very refreshing approach and outlook, the very opposite to the doom and gloom the media encourages us to embrace.

The answer is to practice and develop the Smart Operator Mindset – this ultimately leads to the creation of the high growth individual. We should draw parallels from the world of enterprise and create our own personal business plan, one that maps out a destination with the prioritized tasks to get us there. Here are some pointers for the Smart Operator Mindset:

1. Smart Proposition – define your unique talents, what you love doing, what you want, what gets out of bed. Aligning a future to a basic purpose really does help to accelerate the way forward.

2. Smart Vision – write down your personal intentions for 6 months, 1 year, and 2-years. Base this on your Smart Proposition. Include earnings and other components that make up the life you want

3. Smart Plan – remember a vision without tactics is hallucination. List the things you need to do and get on with it. The right path will emerge when activity is initiated.  Avoid procrastination. Set yourself KPI’s to check whether you are on track.

4. Smart Brand – you are selling yourself, so work out what mental imprints you want to leave on those you meet. Be memorable, deliver on your promises and become the master of your trade. This is what you will become known for.

5. Smart Collaborator – work out who you need to engage and team up with. Alliances and partnerships are a critical part of the Smart Operators DNA.

6. Smart Communicator – master the art of getting messages across, think win-win and live in the world of your audience. Clarity and concise messages that considers both your needs and those of others lead to positive relationships that go somewhere.

7. Smart Connector – work out a plan for finding, reaching and locking into to those individuals and organisations that are important to your personal progression. The connectors and influencers could include suppliers, banks, associates, partners, customers, other departments.

Practice makes perfect, another cliché that I hate, but its true. As Malcolm Gladwell said it takes 10,000 hours to become successful, so that means blood, sweat and tears, I still don’t think there are any short cuts to getting want you want. A combination of being really good at what you love doing, combined with taking ownership of your life fused with determination and persistence help pave the way forward. The Smart Operator Mindset is a framework for you to hang your thinking on.

 


Goldman Sachs Growth Event – 10,000

06/07/2011

I spoke at the MMU/Goldman Sachs event last night and covered what I believe to be the 10 Rules for Growth, here they are:

1.Future Focused – know what you want, business and personally

2.Leadership – continuously learn or the business will leave you behind

3.Build a Great Team – you need thinkers, doers, controllers and sellers

4.A Differentiated Proposition – be clear on what makes you stand out from the crowd

5.Innovation & Creativity – curiosity for exploring new ways of doing things

6.Live in the Customers World – know what they need before they do 

7.Disciplined Systems & Processes – don’t let the wheels come off stay close to KPI’S

8.Life is a Pitch – focus on selling, the lifeblood of entrepreneurship 

9.Having the Right Mindset – its down to you BYC (Believe You Can)

10.Find a Mentor – we all need help, find a companion to support through challenging times

A brilliant initiative, I hope our High Growth Foundation clients take advantage of it.


We Need More Mavericks

04/07/2011

This post follows on from blogs I have written over the past few weeks. Mavericks are passionate, focused, determined and  often a bit off the wall; they are catalysts for change in politics, business and society in general. Mavericks exhibit extremely strong views and challenge opponents with an intensity that cuts like a laser beam. They remain strong to their views never waver in the face of adversity – they live by the principle of when the going gets tough the tough get going. Embedded deep within their psyche is the need for justice, truth and change for the better. They must accomplish their mission because its means so much to them.

One of the best accounts of Maverick behaviour I have come across is that of Pedro Zaragoza Orts, the Mayor of Benidorm from 1950 to 1967. He transformed it from a quiet fishing village to a magnet for tourists, it has  become one of the most popular holiday destinations in Europe and the basis of an award-winning Granada TV programme.

Zaragoza, sold the idea of economic transformation to the late dictator General Franco, one that would lead to allowing bikinis on the beaches! Even in the face of excommunication from the Pope he helped to make the place attractive to millions of foreign tourists who took package holidays to Benidorm. The resort changed forever, from a small village of 1,700 to a bustling holiday city today of 70,000.  This happened because Zaragoza did not want to see his fellow citizens suffer in the  challenge of economic decline. What an achievement – an individual who was in absolute service of his community.

I want to see more of this character in my beloved Manchester, because it’s lacking, ambassadors such as Sir Howard Bernstein. In my view he has done a brilliant job in changing the economic fortunes of the City. We need more of the same, individuals who are on a mission to change for the better and the greater good – not for their own personal gain or profile. Time for change in Manchester!